Pots and pans

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All the ancient pots and pans in these pictures were found in Canterbury and the local area. Some are here to show you how the CAT KIT pottery would look if it was complete. Others are just fun to look at!

Medieval cooking pot
Medieval cooking pot

Medieval cooking pot used for stews etc. Crushed shell have been mixed in with the clay. © Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.

Chafing dish and pipkin
Chafing dish and pipkin

Chafing dish (left). A plate of warm food was placed on top of the 3 little feet. Smouldering charcoal in the bowl of the pot underneath kept the plate warm. The pipkin (right) was a general purpose cooking pot. Both 16th or 17th century. © Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.

Roman flagons or jugs
Roman flagons or jugs

Roman flagons or jugs were used for olive oil and other liquids. © Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.

Tyler Hill
Tyler Hill

Tyler Hill near Canterbury was a good site to make pottery. There was a successful pottery and tile industry there in medieval times. © Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.

Victorian dinner service
Victorian dinner service

A Victorian dinner service. © Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.

Mugs and Tankards
Mugs and Tankards

Colourful mugs and tankards made in England and Germany. 16th to 18th centuries. © Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.

English earthenware
English earthenware

Brown English earthenware pottery. Dish with combed decoration from Staffordshire. 17th and 18th centuries. © Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.

Black friars
Black friars

A reconstruction of medieval Black friars eating in their refectory. © Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.

Medieval food
Medieval food

We made some medieval food! Bread, leek and ‘sops’, pickled herrings and fig pastries. © Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.

Medieval cooking pot
Medieval cooking pot

Medieval cooking pot made at Tyler Hill. It is black with soot where it nestled in an open fire. © Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.

Jugs made at Tyler Hill
Jugs made at Tyler Hill

Jugs made at Tyler Hill. The thumbed base is a typical medieval style. © Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.

Amphora handle
Amphora handle

Sometimes the contents of the amphora were written on the outside. This handle has some rare Roman writing carved into it. © Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.

Roman cremation grave
Roman cremation grave

Pottery was often placed in Roman cremation graves. Sometimes it contained food and drink for the dead person’s journey to the After Life. The scale measures 50 cms. © Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.

Oysters
Oysters

Oysters were very common in Roman times and the ones from Richborough were famous! These oysters came from St Augustine’s Fish Supplies in Whitstable. © Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.

Roman mortarium
Roman mortarium

This animal head has broken off a special Roman bowl used for grinding herbs (a mortarium). What animal does it look like? © Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.