Illuminating the past – Enhancing the present – Inspiring the future

Destined to Serve. Use of the outer grounds of St Augustine’s Abbey, Canterbury, before, during and after  the time of the monks. Canterbury Christ Church University Excavations 1983–2007No 11. Destined to Serve: Use of the outer grounds of St Augustine’s Abbey, Canterbury, before, during and after the time of the monks. Canterbury Christ Church University Excavations 1983–2007
Alison Hicks (2015)

Alison Hicks has brought together the many and varied investigations undertaken on the North Holmes campus of Canterbury Christ Church University between 1983 and 2007. The remains from twenty-five locations are described, spanning from prehistoric to modern times. The campus today is crammed full of academic buildings and it’s an interesting exercise to strip these away, start at the bottom and see how the site developed over time.

The first direct evidence of settlement dates to the Bronze Age, then in the Roman period a cremation cemetery was situated close to the later Sessions House. Another Roman period feature was a masonry conduit which probably helped channel water from the hills east of the site – the same source used later by both St Augustine’s Abbey and Christ Church Priory.

The site really gets busy in the Anglo-Saxon period with the establishment of the monastery of St Peter and St Paul (c AD 598) with lots of features containing debris from metalworking, suggestive of craftworking perhaps servicing the monastery. Then in the middle of the eleventh century, when the abbey church and claustral buildings are thought to have been rebuilt, the area was again pressed into service with such industrial features as a casting pit, a lime kiln and two probable tile kilns being built together with a barn. A ‘large enigmatic feature’ also dates to this period. What could it have been?

St Augustine’s Abbey expanded again from the mid thirteenth century with the development of inner and outer courts. The project area covered a large part of the outer court where such service buildings as the cellarer’s range and brewhouse-bakehouse were located. A large portion of the brewhouse-bakehouse range was revealed enabling more to be gleaned on how the building might have functioned.

The abbey was dissolved in 1538, some parts were converted to a royal palace for Henry VIII and other parts were dismantled. A few buildings survived, including the western end of the brewhouse-bakehouse. The gable end survives today (shown on the cover). As well as an account and discussion of the archaeology of the site, the pottery and the finds, the book includes a documentary history of the outer court by Dr Margaret Sparks.

Softback
A4. 378 pages, 127 figures, 69 plates, colour throughout
ISBN 9781870545327
Price GB £35.00 (FCAT less 20%)

BUY NOW
PUBLISHED BY CANTERBURY ARCHAEOLOGICAL TRUST LTD
AND FUNDED BY CANTERBURY CHRIST CHURCH UNIVERSITY


    open all | close all
transpnttranspnt