Illuminating the past – Enhancing the present – Inspiring the future

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Layers in the groundCenturies of building works leave layers in the ground. Archaeologists call them stratigraphy. The Roman evidence lies between the red lines.


Square cess tankThe archaeologist is standing on a Roman street. The square cess tank was made in Tudor times. It is so deep that it has damaged the Roman street beneath. © Canterbury Archaeological Trust 2006.


StratigraphyArchaeologists find ‘rubbish’ from the past. The oldest is at the bottom. The most recent is at the top. We call these layers stratigraphy. © Canterbury Archaeological Trust 2006.


Canterbury in the Late Iron AgeCanterbury in the Late Iron Age. This reconstruction has been drawn using archaeological evidence found around the area of Whitehall Gardens. © Canterbury City Museums.


Experimental Iron Age site at ButserYou can visit this experimental Iron Age site at Butser in Hampshire.


Iron Age cremation grave in HertfordshireThese things were found in an Iron Age cremation grave in Hertfordshire. The dead person was probably quite wealthy and may have been a chieftain.


Roman invasion, AD 43The route the Roman soldiers took when they invaded Britain in AD 43. © Canterbury Archaeological Trust 2006.


Canterbury in Roman timesCanterbury in Roman times. This reconstruction has been drawn using archaeological evidence. Compare it to the Late Iron Age reconstruction. © Canterbury Archaeological Trust 2006.


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