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archaeologist“What do archaeologists do?”
Shape and colour
Archaeologists look for changes of shape and colour in the ground indicating where something has happened in the past.
© Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.


archaeologist“What do archaeologists do?”
Recording the evidence
Archaeologists usually remove the remains they find so it is very important to record the evidence in situ (while in place) as they go along.
© Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.


archaeologist“What do archaeologists do?”
Human remains
A complete skeleton may hold evidence of gender, age at death, diet and pathological disorders (resulting from disease or lifestyle). Cause of death can rarely be identified from dry bones alone.
© Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.


archaeologist“What do archaeologists do?”
Finds, rather than artefacts
The label in the tray has the excavation site code and context number – where the finds came from on site.
This information is very important as it allows cross referencing between site and finds and between records.
© Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.


archaeologist“What do archaeologists do?”
Environmental evidence
Soil samples may be taken from an excavation to look for small or microscopic fragments of plants and animals (environmental evidence).
© Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.


archaeologist“What do archaeologists do?”
Interpretations of the evidence
Interpretations of the evidence for the Roman town of Canterbury (top) and Canterbury as an Anglo-Saxon settlement (bottom).
© Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.


archaeologist“Do the eyeballs rot away?!”
Durable materials
Some materials are extremely durable and survive well, like fired clay and stone.
© Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.


archaeologist“Do the eyeballs rot away?!”
Durable materials
Some materials are extremely durable and survive well.
Top row, L to R: gold Anglo-Saxon bracteate (pendant) in excellent condition; silver Anglo-Saxon coins; corroded copper alloy object with shield emblem visible by X-ray.
Bottom row, L to R: glass Anglo-Saxon cone beakers; animal bone Roman toggle; stone Bronze Age archer’s wrist guard.
© Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.


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