Illuminating the past – Enhancing the present – Inspiring the future

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archaeologist“How do you know where to dig?”
Redevelopment site
Most Archaeology in Britain takes place on redevelopment sites, before erecting shops and houses, building road extensions etc.
© Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.


archaeologist“How do you know where to dig?”
Investigating archaeological sites
Some ways of finding or investigating archaeological sites.
© Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.


archaeologist“How do you know where to dig?”
Buried remains
Buried remains in the countryside can show up as crop marks in a field.
© Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.
Reconstruction drawing © Worcestershire County Council; artist Steve Rigby.


archaeologist“How can things get buried?”
Buried in the ground
There are many ways that big and small things become buried in the ground.
© Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.


archaeologist“How does the ground get higher?”
Build up of layers
Various activities over the centuries have resulted in a build up of layers.
© Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.


archaeologist“How do you know it’s Roman (or whatever…)?”
Commemorative mug
This is probably a commemorative mug for a special event. It is very rare to find pottery with a date on!
© Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.


archaeologist“How do you know it’s Roman (or whatever…)?”
Dating by association
Everything is dated by association with something else. In general, the bottom layer is the oldest (or earliest). The top layer is the most recent (or latest).
© Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.


archaeologist“How do you know it’s Roman (or whatever…)?”
Dating by association
With the principle of most recent at the top and oldest at the bottom, all things found in between are dated according to what is found above, below, with or alongside them. This is dating by association.
© Canterbury Archaeological Trust Ltd.


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