Illuminating the past – Enhancing the present – Inspiring the future

 USEFUL INFORMATION | TESTIMONIALS | annie.partridge@canterburytrust.co.uk

The course programme for 2017/18

Date Activity/event
23rd September 2017 First steps in archaeology (1)
30th September 2017 Prehistoric Kent
3rd October 2017 Supporting history in the primary school
7th October 2017 NEW Roman Britain and the Romano-British
21st October 2017 NEW Durovernon and Durovernum: Iron Age and early Roman Canterbury
4th November 2017 NEW Dark Age Canterbury: the death and rebirth of a city
18th November 2017 Medieval East Kent
25th November 2017 NEW Pottery identification: a beginner’s guide
2nd December 2017 Roman pottery: an introduction
6th January 2018 My place in history
13th January 2018 First steps in archaeology (2)
20th January 2018 Archaeological report writing
3rd–4th February 2018 The archaeology of death
17th February 2018 NEW Medieval and Tudor Canterbury
24th February 2018 Understanding and recording stratigraphy
2nd–4th March 2018 Putting colour in the past: an introduction to environmental archaeology
10th March 2018 NEW Who do we think we are? The archaeology of migration, nationality and ethnicity
24th March 2018 First steps in archaeology (3)

Unless otherwise specified, courses are held at the Canterbury Archaeological Trust, 92a Broad Street, Canterbury, Kent, CT1 2LU and run from 10.00am – 4.00pm.


First steps in archaeology (1)

Whether you are considering archaeology as a future career, or just wanting to try a new hobby, this is the place to start! Anyone can get involved in archaeology and this day school provides the perfect introduction to the subject. After examining what archaeology is, the course will go on to cover a wide range of topics, including time periods and how we date things, sources and types of evidence, archaeological methods and practices, and the different types of archaeology. Guidance will be provided on how to take your interest further, either through additional training, higher education or as a volunteer. No previous experience or knowledge is required. Students will get the chance to handle a range of artefacts during the day. This popular course is repeated in January and March (see below).

Tutor: Andrew Richardson

Saturday 23rd September 2017

Fee: £45 (£40 for FCAT)

STANDARD:
FRIENDS:

Prehistoric Kent

This one-day course will cover the prehistory of Kent, a period of over half a million years. The course will trace the development of the Kentish landscape itself from the Palaeolithic (Old Stone Age) onwards, including the formation of the Channel and the severing of the last land-bridge to the Continent. The introduction of farming, along with the creation of monuments, changing attitudes to and treatment of the dead, introduction of metal working and other technologies, and development of settlements, long distance links, and society will be among the many topics considered. The course will be illustrated with case studies and finds drawn from the Trust’s archives.

Tutor: Jake Weekes

Date: Saturday 30th September 2017

Fee: £45 (£40 for FCAT)

STANDARD:
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Supporting history in the primary school

If you are an EYFS, KS 1 or KS 2 teacher, History Co-ordinator, home schooler, or History/Archaeology club leader, there should be something of interest for you on this interactive day course.

We will be looking at:

  • how Archaeology and artefacts (or more correctly ‘finds’ ) can support History and cross-curricular teaching and learning in your classroom;
  • our extensive range of handling collections for loan county-wide plus digital materials;
  • recent resources to support Local Studies or elements of British History featuring the Dover Bronze Age Boat, Folkestone’s Vanishing Roman villa and Anglo-Saxon Lyminge;
  • using toys and stories to develop History skills in very young children and help meet Early Learning Goals.

Tutor: Marion Green.
Marion is CAT’s Education Officer. She is experienced in working with primary school pupils and teachers in Kent and with student teachers in training at Canterbury Christ Church University.

Tuesday 3rd October 2017

Venue: Friends Meeting House, The Friars, Canterbury CT1 2AS

Fee: £80 (£75 for FCAT)

STANDARD:
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Roman Britain and the Romano-British

New course!

Strange as it may seem, there were never that many Romans, relatively speaking, in Roman Britain! There were always many more people we would now call ‘Romano-British’, people of often native descent who, over half a millennium, formulated their own versions of ‘Romaness’ in all areas of life. Actual Romans, themselves an increasingly mixed bunch, might have seen many of these provincial attempts to ‘fit in’ as quite a joke! From our point of view, it is the (often regionally varied) mix of cultural traits that makes the study of the Romano-British, the real people of Roman Britain, so fascinating.

Tutor: Jake Weekes

Saturday 7th October 2017

Fee: £45 (£40 for FCAT)

STANDARD:
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Durovernon and Durovernum: Iron Age and early Roman Canterbury

New course!

Investigating the origins of Canterbury, one of the first towns in Britain, starting from an Iron Age centre with probable religious significance and going through numerous changes to become the late Roman town which bequeathed its form to later versions of the city. This is a 500 year story which we now begin to understand in far greater detail through recent finds of superb archaeological evidence.

Tutor: Jake Weekes

Saturday 21st October 2017

Fee: £45 (£40 for FCAT)

STANDARD:
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Dark Age Canterbury: the death and rebirth of a city

New course!

In the last years of Roman Britain the city of Durovernum appears to have undergone rapid collapse, with bodies remaining unburied and the streets becoming choked with debris. By the late fourth or early fifth century, it may have largely ceased to function as an urban centre. Yet, by the end of the sixth century, the place that would become the city of Canterbury was again a centre of power, this time for the Kentish royal dynasty and the newly arrived Christian church. This course will explore in detail how this sudden death and rebirth of a city took place, drawing on historical and archaeological evidence, including over four decades of work by Canterbury Archaeological Trust. Much of the archaeological evidence is yet to be fully published, and throws new light on this dark and seismic period in the story of Canterbury.

Tutor: Andrew Richardson

Saturday 4th November 2017

Fee: £45 (£40 for FCAT)

STANDARD:
FRIENDS:

Medieval East Kent

East Kent was important in the story of medieval England, and this course will take a fresh look at the archaeology of the area dating from the Norman Conquest through to the early Tudor period. Through a series of lectures, the course will cover a number of urban case studies over time, including Canterbury and important Cinque Ports in the vicinity, and also rural lives. An underlying principle of the course is to begin to understand both the formative, and the distinctly ‘foreign’, aspects of local medieval life at a turning point in history.

Tutors: James Holman and Jake Weekes

Date: Saturday 18th November 2017

Fee: £45 (£40 for FCAT)

STANDARD:
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Pottery identification: a beginner’s guide

New course!

Drawing on the Trust’s extensive collections of material excavated from Canterbury sites and elsewhere in Kent, we will be illustrating some of the key developments in ceramic technologies and styles from the prehistoric to post-medieval periods in Britain. The day will include a series of presentations and opportunities to handle, examine and compare pottery from the principal periods of the past three millennia. By the end of the day we hope you will be able to recognise some key differences between pottery types – and that you will also have learnt something about the difficulties involved in identifying and dating archaeological ceramics.

Tutors: Marion Green and Andrew Savage

Saturday 25th November 2017

Fee: £45 (£40 for FCAT)

STANDARD:
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Roman pottery: an introduction

Pottery is one of the key types of evidence recovered by archaeologists, crucial not just as a tool for dating but also as evidence of the types of activity at a site, and for trade between sites and regions. This course will provide an introduction to the identification and study of Roman pottery. Drawing upon CAT’s pottery fabric series and extensive collections, students will be guided through the main types of Roman pottery found in Britain, including both imported wares, the major Romano-British industries, and locally produced wares.

Tutor: Andrew Savage

Date: Saturday 2nd December 2017

Fee: £45 (£40 for Friends of CAT)

STANDARD:
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My place in history

This one-day course introduces the art of desk-based archaeological study, guiding students in researching into the history of where they live, or another chosen location in the UK. We’ll be looking primarily at how to build and understand the historical and archaeological narrative of a place using the large number of web-resources now freely available, but there will also be pointers on how to develop a study by visiting archives, for example. By the end of the course, all in attendance should have the confidence and resources to conduct their own desk-based research into the historic environment, and communicate their findings.

Tutor: Jake Weekes

Date: Saturday 6th January 2018

Fee: £45 (£40 for FCAT)

STANDARD:
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First steps in archaeology (2)

Whether you are considering archaeology as a future career, or just wanting to try a new hobby, this is the place to start! Anyone can get involved in archaeology and this day school provides the perfect introduction to the subject. After examining what archaeology is, the course will go on to cover a wide range of topics, including time periods and how we date things, sources and types of evidence, archaeological methods and practices, and the different types of archaeology. Guidance will be provided on how to take your interest further, either through additional training, higher education or as a volunteer. No previous experience or knowledge is required. Students will get the chance to handle a range of artefacts during the day.

Tutor: Andrew Richardson

Date: Saturday 13th January 2018

Fee: £45 (£40 for FCAT)

STANDARD:
FRIENDS:

Archaeological report writing

This course will provide a step-by-step guide to the preparation and writing of archaeological reports, covering the key information that should be included. Students will be introduced to the different levels of archaeological reports, from reports of negative results, through interim, assessment, analysis and publication reports. The course will also explore the different options for publication and dissemination, including ‘grey literature’, online, journal articles and monographs. Templates for different types of reports will be provided, along with examples of short reports.

Tutor: Jake Weekes

Date: Saturday 20th January 2018

Fee: £45 (£40 for Friends of CAT)

STANDARD:
FRIENDS:

The archaeology of death

This two-day course will provide an introduction to the excavation, recording, analysis and interpretation of funerary remains. Students will be instructed in the handling and care of human skeletal material by an osteologist. The course will also explore the place of cemeteries and monuments in the wider landscape and the study of funerary assemblages as a whole, including graves, grave structures and fittings, grave goods and evidence associated with cremations. Emphasis will be placed on how to view all these elements as the visible remains of funeral ceremonies and on how we can seek to reconstruct those ceremonies as fully as possible.

Tutors: Isobel Curwen and Jake Weekes

Date: Saturday 3rd and Sunday 4th February 2018

Fee: £80 (£75 for FCAT)

STANDARD:
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Medieval and Tudor Canterbury

New course!

Drawing on work previously undertaken by the Trust and documentary sources, this one-day course will provide students with the opportunity to explore Canterbury’s development from the Black Death (c.1350) to the Reformation (c.1550). This period witnessed a resurgence of pilgrimage and its dramatic ending, the building of great inns and the introduction of such features as chimneys, and considerable changes to the lives of ordinary townsfolk at work, at play and in their religious worship. Through a combination of lectures and workshops, students will learn about the city, its citizens and their communities of ward and parish, as well as having the opportunity to work with a range of primary sources.

Tutor: Sheila Sweetinburgh

Saturday 17th February 2018

Fee: £45 (£40 for FCAT)

STANDARD:
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Understanding and recording stratigraphy

An understanding of stratigraphy and the concept of ‘context’ is essential to anyone undertaking archaeological excavation. This course will provide clear instruction on both the theory of stratigraphy and practical ways in which it can be effectively recognised, recorded and interpreted. Practical exercises will lead students through such tasks as completing a context sheet, drawing plans and sections, completing stratigraphic matrices and using site records to create sets, groups and phases.

Tutor: Peter Clark

Date: Saturday 24th February 2018

Fee: £45 (£40 for FCAT)

STANDARD:
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Putting colour in the past: an introduction to environmental archaeology

The study of plant and animal remains from archaeological deposits can provide many insights into the lifestyle and diet of past human societies, their use of local land and resources, and ancient environments. The first part of this three-day course will focus on the types of remains that can be preserved on archaeological sites and how they are recovered. Instruction will be given in the taking and processing of environmental samples, followed by a session sorting dried sample residues that will introduce some of the more commonly recovered remains.

The second and third days will provide more detail on the study of bones of fish, bird and mammals, invertebrates and charred plant remains, mainly using examples from CAT sites. This will include hands-on sessions with a variety of remains. The course will conclude with examples of how combining information from various sources can be used to visualise ancient environments.

DAY 1

During the day participants will find out:

  • what environmental archaeology is;
  • how animal and plant remains preserved on archaeological sites can provide insights into ancient environments and human lifestyle;
  • how the type of sediment in which remains are buried influences what may be preserved;
  • what remains are likely to be found in particular features and deposits;
  • why, where, and how to take samples.

PRACTICAL SESSIONS
Bulk sample processing and sorting dried sample residues to extract biological remains and artefacts.

DAY 2

  • Investigating what vertebrate remains can tell you about the past, including examples from CAT sites.
  • Insect remains.

PRACTICAL SESSIONS
With vertebrate and insect remains.

DAY 3

  • Investigating charred plant remains.
  • Use of indicator groups.
  • Multi-proxy studies to visualise ancient environments.

PRACTICAL SESSION
With charred plant remains.

Tutors: Enid Allison, Alex Vokes and Hazel Mosley

Friday 2nd to Sunday 4th March 2018

Fee: £180 (£175 for FCAT)

STANDARD:
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Who do we think we are? The archaeology of migration, nationality and ethnicity

New course!

Modern humans first ventured out of Africa around 100,000 years ago, into a world already populated by earlier species such as Neanderthals. Since that time, the human race has divided and defined itself along lines of race, culture, religion, language or nation. Tribalism seems to be deeply embedded in the human psyche. The concept of ethnicity has developed to define distinct groups that share a common culture, religion, language or national identity, whilst the migration of groups, in the past and the present, is often a source of conflict, but also of rapid and dynamic change, for better or for worse.

Migration and identity have often been a focus of interest for archaeologists and historians, not always with positive results. And with the widespread popularity of inexpensive DNA testing, growing numbers of people are now being provided with data that aims to provide a detailed break-down of their own genetic history.

With such topics remaining as contentious as ever, this course explores and discusses these issues from an archaeological perspective, with a focus on what archaeological evidence can contribute to our understanding of human ethnic identity and migration. Topics covered include: the migration of modern humans out of Africa; evidence for migration in the archaeological record; the cultural impact of migration; migration as an explanation for change; evidence from ancient DNA; interpreting modern DNA sampling; ethnicity as an aspect of human identity. Whether you consider yourself a Citizen of the World or a confirmed Brexiteer, come along and join a lively discussion about who you, and we, really are.

Tutors: Martin Crowther and Andrew Richardson

Saturday 10th March 2018. Fee: £45 (£40 for FCAT)

Fee: £45 (£40 for FCAT)

STANDARD:
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First steps in archaeology (3)

Whether you are considering archaeology as a future career, or just wanting to try a new hobby, this is the place to start! Anyone can get involved in archaeology and this day school provides the perfect introduction to the subject. After examining what archaeology is, the course will go on to cover a wide range of topics, including time periods and how we date things, sources and types of evidence, archaeological methods and practices, and the different types of archaeology. Guidance will be provided on how to take your interest further, either through additional training, higher education or as a volunteer. No previous experience or knowledge is required. Students will get the chance to handle a range of artefacts during the day.

Tutor: Andrew Richardson

Date: Saturday 24th March 2018

Fee: £45 (£40 for FCAT)

STANDARD:
FRIENDS:

Friends of the Canterbury Archaeological Trust Friends of Canterbury Archaeological Trust receive a discount on course fees as well as on our publications.If you would like to join the Friends please visit their pages,
or email: friends@canterburytrust.co.uk

 Testimonials

Very good well presented course.” NF.
Plenty of visual material and fast pace kept interest!.” MB.
Practical and engaging, included multi-media resources to maintain interest and accommodated different learning styles… It motivated me to want to expose my children to the experiences Marion spoke about.” Key Stage 2 teacher.
I enjoyed the mix of interesting lectures/slides with a chance to see and handle the bones as well…..I think this was great value for money and very interesting.” RR.
I knew very little before the course and feel much better informed now…..please put on more such courses. Very enjoyable indeed.” JI.
A great introductory course for people who are interested in archaeology. I have learnt lots and will recommend it to anyone interested.” MT.
Background facts, real stories, tour of premises, looking [at] and discussing finds and what they mean. Open and friendly tutor who is an expert.” CK.
Thank you for the excellent day. I’d be pleased to know about more courses/acting as a volunteer.” BC.
Knowledgeable tutor, comfortable venue, pot handling, excellent power point presentation, tour of CAT offices. Friendly and accessible staff. Beautiful booklet. Really enjoyable and informative day.” JI.
Very clear, helpful presentation and infinitely more useful than the last pottery course I attended!” EB.
Very enjoyable and greatly enjoyed the enthusiasm and knowledge of the two archaeologists taking the course.” MC.
Very enjoyable and informative. Was pleased the lectures were at a level I could understand and included humour!” GC.
I am going to attend many more courses. I have the bug.” MC.

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Useful information

Unless otherwise specified, courses are held at the Canterbury Archaeological Trust, 92a Broad Street, Canterbury, Kent, CT1 2LU and run from 10.00am – 4.00pm.
Use the add to cart button, or contact annie.partridge@canterburytrust.co.uk to book a place.

Map of Canterbury showing location of CAT offices

Terms and conditions

All courses must be booked and paid for in advance. Fees will only be refunded in exceptional circumstances and will be subject to a £20 administration charge. The Trust reserves the right to cancel courses due to insufficient enrolments; in such cases the decision will usually be taken one week before the date of the course and in such cases students will be refunded in full.

Canterbury Archaeological Trust was formed in 1975 to undertake excavations, research, publication and the presentation of the results of its work to the public. Employing a core staff of 40 highly qualified field archaeologists and specialists, it is the largest professional archaeological organisation in Kent.
* If you have suggestions for a particular course not covered here, or if you represent a group with specific archaeological training needs, please get in touch and we can discuss bespoke training to meet your requirements.
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